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Makeup Weapons

#BIO GLITTER "GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES" A GAME CHANGER IN THE WORLD OF GLITTER

$23.95

 

 

DON'T LET ANYONE DULL YOUR SPARKLE 
FEATURING "GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES" 
THIS BESPOKE MIX "GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES"
IS A CUSTOM BLEND OF DIFFERENT GOLD TONES  
 Makeup Weapons Bio-Glitter is a Biodegradable Film Made from Primarily Eucalyptus Trees, Sourced from Responsibly Managed Plantations. This range is EXCLUSIVE to Makeup Weapons and hand blended by Sheri to be suitable for use for the professional and enthusiast and on any area of the body including the face
WHY USE MAKEUP WEAPONS BIO GLITTER?
Bio Glitter is physically 30-40% softer than Plastic Glitter
Other Glitters are PET Plastic Based (and DO NOT BREAK DOWN in the environment and have an adverse effect on MARINE WILDLIFE)
Paraben Free (no nasty chemicals to cause irritation)
Plastic Free (much nicer.softer to use on the face
and environmentally friendly)
THE SMALL CHANGES WE MAKE ALL ADD UP
AND COUNT TOWARDS THE BIG PICTURE 
MAKEUP WEAPONS BIO GLITTER COMES IN 7 SPARKLY COLOURS
 
ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS -TICKING THE GREEN BOXES  
Cosmetic Bio Glitter replaces the polyester film used in traditional cosmetic glitter with a very special form of cellulose extracted from hardwoods, primarily eucalyptus sourced from responsibly managed and certified plantations operating to PEFC standards.
Completely unique, Bio Glitter is the only glitter available on the market which is now PROVEN to biodegrade into a harmless substance in the natural environment.  
(Do not inhale and not for use in the eyes)
Story by Plastic Soup 
Glitters are spreading fast. Nowadays they are found in products such as nail polish, hairspray, shampoo and suntan lotion. Then there are the party-glitters that you put on your face. It all seems harmless and nice, but it is not. Glitters are predominantly made of plastic, often a combination of aluminium and PET. They are flushed away with the shower water and easily end up in the environment.
Worldwide, the sale of all glitter products has grown tremendously in recent years. Most users don’t realize that glitters are bits of plastic and that using them contributes to the plastic soup. Social media such as Instagram are believed to be partly responsible for the growth because people share photos and imitate each other. See for examples of this on Instagram.
While the presence of microplastics in care products  has been amply discussed in recent years, glitters seem to have been ignored. The attention was focused primarily on banning microplastics with a scrub function. When legislation prohibits only those plastic scrub particles, glitters and other microplastics are beyond that scope. 
Maria Westerbos, Director of the Plastic Soup Foundation: “Think twice about wearing glitters the coming holidays, and if you still want to, ask explicitly for glitters that are not made of plastic.”
Last year English Scientists  called for a ban on glitter.
THE  INDEPENDENT 
written by Josh Gabbatiss
Glitter should be Banned says English Scientists With a microbead ban coming into force in the UK next year, attention is turning to other potential hazards
Glitter seems like a harmless bit of fun, but its environmental impact has led some scientists to call for it to be banned.Most glitter is made from plastic, and the small size of its particles makes it a potential ecological hazard, particularly in the oceans.
“I think all glitter should be banned, because it’s microplastic,” said Dr Trisia Farrelly, an environmental anthropologist at Massey University.

Microplastics are fragments of plastic less than 5 millimetres in length. Their size makes them an appealing – though dangerous – food item for many animals.Not only have marine animals from plankton to whales been documented eating plastic, often with fatal consequences, microplastics can end up inside us when we consume seafood. One study led by Professor Richard Thompson reported that plastic was found in a third of UK-caught fish.

Some estimates place the number of microplastics in the world's ocean at up to 51 trillion fragments in total.Plastic pollution plaguing our seas

Environment Secretary Michael Govesaid that plastic waste was “putting marine wildlife under serious threat”.

Glitter could be an overlooked component in the wider problem of marine plastic pollution, and they are used in a wide range of products.  

“I was quite concerned when somebody bought my daughters some shower gel that had glitter particles in it,” said Professor Thompson. 

“When people think about glitter they think of party and dress-up glitter,” said Dr Trisia Farrelly, an environmental anthropologist at Massey University. “But glitter includes cosmetic glitters as well, the more everyday kind that people don’t think about as much.”

Most glitter is made of aluminium and a plastic called PET.  Dr Farrelly has investigated how PET can break down to release chemicals that disrupt hormones in the bodies of animals and humans.

Such chemicals have been linked with the onset of cancers and neurological diseases.

With attention fixed on microbeads, other forms of plastic – including glitter – are being ignored. “No one knows that glitter is made of plastic,” says Noemi Lamanna, 

As in the UK, the government in Dr Farrelly’s native New Zealand has also taken steps towards curtailing the use of microbeads, but she says it is currently unclear whether or not this will include glitters.

According to a spokesperson for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if glitter is incorporated into ‘rinse-off’ cosmetics and personal care products it will be covered by the\ban. 

Moreover, eco-friendly glitter that breaks down quickly could be a viable replacement that doesn’t end up in the food chain. 

Some cosmetics chains have replaced glitter in products with synthetic, biodegradable alternatives in a move praised by Dr Sue Kinsey, senior pollution policy officer at the Marine Conservation Society. “It’s a positive move by the company, who have listened to advice and clearly understand the threat,” she said.

“It also sends out a clear message to their customers who will hopefully try and make the right choices in other areas of their shopping,” she said.

Avoiding cosmetic glitter and microbeads is a “no-brainer”, Dr Ferrelly said, but added that change needs to come from the top down.

“I’m sick and tired of consumers being help responsible for trying to avoid this stuff. I mean it’s literally impossible to,” she added.  “Producers need to be responsible. They need to use safer, non-toxic, durable alternatives.”Microplastics are fragments of plastic less than 5 millimetres in length. Their size makes them an appealing – though dangerous – food item for many animals.Not only have marine animals from plankton to whales been documented eating plastic, often with fatal consequences, microplastics can end up inside us when we consume seafood. One study led by Professor Richard Thompson reported that plastic was found in a third of UK-caught fish. Some estimates place the number of microplastics in the world's ocean at up to 51 trillion fragments in total.

 

 

 


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